Indoor Dog Behaviors and What They Mean

Dogs can be funny sometimes, and I don’t just mean when they chase their tails, sometimes they have odd dog behaviors that can appear out of nowhere. Understanding their dog behaviors may mean that you will need to talk to a veterinarian, or perhaps research the cause of their actions online.

But before you can do this, you need to know what exactly can be identified as perhaps odd indoor dog behavior that needs help and what is odd, but actually harmless. To help you decode the antics of your dog is the following list of the top indoor dog behaviors and what they mean.


Biting

First, you need to identify if your dog is biting or is she nipping in a playful fashion? A puppy, when still learning proper behavior may nip to get your attention, or she may be overly playful and bite harder in the excitement of her play.

Even playful biting, however, should be deterred and so training is often required when a dog’s biting seems to be getting out of hand. If you notice that your dog’s biting is outside of play and seems aggressive you should try to pinpoint the reasons behind the biting.

Is it due to anxiety? Is she afraid of someone or something? Pay close attention to how her mood may influence her habits, and see if you can identify her reason for biting. Sometimes, growling and biting go hand in hand, or paw in paw, so to speak, if this is the case, aggression is likely the feeling behind this.


Urinating Inside

Probably one of the quickest reactions you will see from an owner is when his or her dog pees inside the house. Understanding this dog behavior isn’t actually that hard to figure out, usually. It is often a sign that something is wrong, a urinary infection, kidney failure, or even a bladder infection may be the cause.

In some cases, it can be due to a dog’s age and the fact that she is starting to experience dementia. If you experience this in your home, talk to your veterinarian straight away. If urinating turns into defecating, this too needs to be checked out by a professional.


Digging

Dogs like to dig, whether to bury a bone, to get out of a tight situation, to sniff out and track down another animal, or even to make a spot a little more comfortable. Digging inside the home is one of the dog behaviors that shouldn’t really cause you to worry.

In fact, you may even notice a routine to her digging, like before she gets comfortable in her bed to take a nap. If it does bother you, or it becomes an issue with her damaging your couch, you may try some behavioral training or see if you can get some dog-training tips.

Also, she could be digging out of boredom, so, you may want to try some of these great tips at keeping her happy if you live in an apartment, such as creating her own space where she can act as she please, so she doesn’t dig up yours.

Excessive Panting

Dogs pant, it’s how they cool off, especially on a hot day. But, if you notice she is still panting a lot, especially indoors and when you have the air conditioning on, then you may want to check to see that she is properly hydrated and that she doesn’t have a high temperature, a sign that something else is amiss.


Excessive Barking

Dog barking is one of the most disruptive dog behaviors, not just for the owner, but for the surrounding neighbors who have to listen to the barking throughout the day or even night. If you live in an apartment, where there is a lot of traffic outside of your front door, this can become a real issue.

Dogs bark for a variety of reasons, it is their form of communication with other dogs, as a greeting, a warning, or even if they are feeling lonely. A dog will often bark to protect her territory, so, if the barking becomes too much, seek out some training and work on it with your favorite pup.

Dog barking is one of the most disruptive dog behaviors, not just for the owner, but for the surrounding neighbors who have to listen to the barking throughout the day or even night. If you live in an apartment in a city like Chicago, where there is a lot of traffic outside of your front door, this can become a real issue.


Clinging to Her Owner

A dog that becomes clingy and doesn’t want to leave your side, or continually tries to sit on your feet or between your legs is often trying to tell you that she feels anxious or unsafe. This behavior may require a visit to your vet, but you may want to try finding ways to reassure her.

Spending some quality time, time that includes taking her outside of the home is very important. Be sure to check out these important reasons to make sure that your dog gets some daily exercise outside of the home; if this doesn’t help, be sure to discuss her behavior with a professional.

Other Oddities

Other odd dog behaviors that may show up over the span of your dog’s life include excessive bad breath, non-stop circling, head pressing, scooting, (that is, dragging her bottom along the floor) chewing everything in sight, and extreme licking.

These bizarre and often abnormal actions often require that you talk to a professional or an experienced dog friend, whether a trainer or a veterinarian. Remember, it’s always best to be safe rather than sorry, so if it worries you, it’s best to get it checked out.

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below

Leave a Reply:

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons